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Titanic - They Shouldn't Have Been Frozen
The ocean where the Titanic sunk was full of salt water. If they knew anything at all, they would know that salt water does not make icicles off of people. And it wouldn't have made the people look so much like ice. Duh people.
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common sense
Avg. Rating:    4.7 of 10 - (158 votes cast)
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Contributed By:
ymfpitw on 11-24-2000
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Comments:
Matrix_Forensics_Laboratories writes:
So I suppose there shouldn't be any icebergs there too?
54 of 59 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
SAIFishness writes:
The fact is, there was very little salt actually in the water at that location, less than in other parts of the ocean. Why? because of the iceberg. As the iceberg melts, the fresh water flows off of the iceberg and on the surface of the salt water. the fresh water stays on top due to its density, and slowly mixes with the salt water. they might as well be swimming in fresh water.
20 of 24 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
dave writes:
Come on behave yourself. In England If you leave your washing on the line over night in your garden and the temp drops to around 2 or 3 degrees, after an hour your clothes are as stiff as a board and covered in frost. At the temps on that night in that location (around -12 air temp) after half an hour your clothes would be freezing covered in ice and frost, as would your hair and eyebrows and beards. The film is accurate. Most of the people you see are not covered in frozen water (like say Kate Winslet on the chunk of wood) they are covered in frost caused through the air temps as they have their heads/shoulders exposed to the night.
13 of 16 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Steve Austin writes:
Actually, I don't know whether or not salt water can freeze, but I do know that no matter what kind of water you are in, if it's cold enough, you will freeze to death! The "crystals" as you call them are probably "snot" that froze. Jack and Rose were a pale white from being so cold. There was ice in their hair, yes, but still it's a movie people! They're called SPECIAL EFFECTS!!!!!
10 of 14 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
KOsborn writes:
The water WAS below freezing. Before he went off duty Officer Lightoller tested the water's temperature - as he and every other officer was required to do. The water at that time was 28 degrees F- which is 4 fahrenheit degrees below freezing. In Celsius this would be about -2 degrees. So yes, the water was cold. And we can know this because Lightoller survived.
5 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
brent84ty writes:
Actually, ymfpitw is right. Along with the salt water deal, it wasn't below freezing. And about there being icebergs. THEY WERE MELTING!!! The berg that sank the Titanic melted within the next three days.
5 of 9 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Matrix_Forensics_Laboratories writes:
True, you people are correct (to some point), the icebergs are melting, and drifting away, but my point was IF THE SALT-CONCENTRATION IS AS HIGH AS HE SAYS, HOW COULD THEY FORM IN THE FIRST PLACE? Maybe this is really one of the world's most astounding phenomenas. Lets call the X-Files. How is it possible to form ice with so much salt? There really is not as much as he says. The salt in that region was the same as every other ocean on this planet. And yes, the water WAS below freezing. It was at night with no sun, the Titanic was close to the top of the Northern Hemisphere, the water was dead calm(no friction with other water molecules, i.e, shake a bottle of cool water violently, and it will warm up), therefore, all these factors contribute to making the water below freezing, it was about -20 Celsius. Water freezes at about 1 or 0 Celsius (depending on the salt and iron content of the water too). If there was salt present in water, it would freeze at about -5, -10 or sometimes even -20 celsius. SO THE WATER WAS BELOW 0. People died from hypothermia and some drowned from cramp reticulation in minutes. It was not the temperature of the tropical Bahamnas you might say. So there you all go.
5 of 9 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Jack Calvin writes:
I think I remember them having frost all over their body. If they did then the slip-up is correct.
4 of 8 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Amadahy writes:
The water was below freezing. Salt lowers the freezing point of water to about 25-30 deg F, and freezing is 32 deg F. So, yes, they could freeze. Also, the air and water themselves would be cooler from the proximity to the iceberg. Ever noticed how ice cools a drink and the air around it feels cooler? Same thing. Pretend the iceberg is a giant icecube in the giant drink of the ocean. It's all science.
0 of 0 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
NatedaGreat writes:
Actually, it was the mucus that was frozen[ your nose runs when you get cold!]. Even though mucus contains salt, it can still freeze, when not in the body.
3 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
The Tizzinatrix writes:
Being a college student who likes to play with my food, I have taken a glass of wet ice, poured a large amount of salt on it and watched it freeze to the side of the glass. The salt does lower the freezing point, but it doesn't make it impossible to refreeze what was melted. Trust me, you can try it yourself.
2 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Morna writes:
I agree that the air temp was below freezing...the areas of the body that were wet and exposed to the air would indeed get icy.
1 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Brainless writes:
HOW ICEBERGS FORM: up north, by the polar caps, huge glaciers (huge "rivers" made out of ice) are formed. The glaciers slowly move downhill, until they either melt or reach the ocean, where they break off in huge chunks, now called icebergs. Unsurprisingly, the icebergs are made out of freshwater, and float around aimlessly in the ocean until they melt, sink ships, etc. I'll be back later to explain the frozen body comments, since I don't have much time
1 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
lynsey writes:
I actually read that while filming, it was so cold that the make-up kept freezing and there was nothing they could do about it, so thats why they all look like ice.
1 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Calvin Klein writes:
icebergs don't form by their selfs in the middle of the ocean they break and drift, so thats why the iceberg was there!
1 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
brent84ty writes:
Oh yeah, It doesn't take water below freezing to give you hypothermia. You can get it on a nice day, in warmer weather while the water is 65 degrees F. Trust me, if you been a swimming pool that was 75 degrees F...you know that's COLD...BUT NOT FREEZING COLD.....
2 of 7 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Chatterbox writes:
Hey, Matrix_Forensics_Laboratories, you are a thinking guy. LOL! Chatterbox
0 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
kamakazikid writes:
when you add salt to water it lowers the freezing tempature so it will not freeze at 32 degrees. but a human will freeze. and they used specal makeup to make the actors look frozen.
0 of 5 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
brent84ty writes:
First of all, the Titanic was NOT close to the top of the Northern Atmosphere. It was closer to New York than it was from Southampton. And NO the water was NOT below freezing, NO it was NOT mucus that was covering their bodies, maybe close to their noses but NO...Trust me on this one...I've read enough books on real life accounts from the survivors...I think I should know...Hate to put it that way.....
1 of 17 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


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