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Titanic - Propeller
The Titanic's middle propeller was not used for manoeuvring in port, and hence would have been stationary when starting away from the dock.
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Contributed By:
Wallace on 01-10-2000
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Comments:
dave writes:
Unfortunately most of the below have not actually realised that the middle propellor which was a Parson's low pressure steam turbine actually ran off the excess steam that was produced from the port and starboard propellors, therefore when they were working the middle steam turbine also kicked in. You couldn't have one without the other, sorry!!! It was an automatic thing built into the Titanic for efficiency apart from that the other comments are right about the fact that this propellor slowed down the turning cycle of the ship at the vital moment. This was due to the location of it just in front of the rudder which effected its turning performance
9 of 12 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Ohiogrl writes:
I think they used it for effect
4 of 4 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Sylvalin writes:
It is true that the middle propeller was not used in port. However, J.C. knew about this, but he used the middle prop anyway "for effect".
3 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Jerryrip writes:
Yes that is correct. The middle screw was driven with a steam turbine whereas the two others were driven with reciprocating steam engines. The middle screw also couldn't be used with the engines in reverse that would make sense since to maneuver in port you might have to put one or both engines in reverse. I didn't notice in the movie that the middle screw was used.
2 of 3 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Big Ross writes:
Many maritime experts believe that if the Titanic had maintained its speed, rather than slowing down, the extra steerage way would have enabled it to turn around the iceberg. In the scene where the props rear up out of the water, the rudder has been made unnaturally thin to show the middle prop more clearly. Artistically satisfying, but not very accurate!
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
Mr. Jack writes:
i agree with Jerryrip and the rest of you are WRONG. It didn't show the middle propeller moving when the "Titanic" left the dock. But those who said the middle propeller didn't work in reverse, you are right.
1 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes
ymeng2000 writes:
Also the middle propeller actually prevented the Titanic from slowing down to avoid collision.
0 of 1 people found this comment helpful. Did you? Yes


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